Gone are the days of acoustic guitars and piano accompaniments. Now its all synthesizers, auto tuning and electric drum kits. For some, this is seen as a nightmare, a disaster to music as we know it. Others say it’s the best thing that could happen to the industry, it’s ‘Modern’. Personally, I have no extremist opinion of such a movement. Yeah, songs all sound the same now, and mainstream music is nothing more than electronics, but think about music as a whole. Many experience individuals with a fair amount of free time can now produce music of arguably a better standard than industry professionals. This may sound like a petty claim, but this means the music industry in its entirety is now in the hands of people at home, with nothing more than a computer.

If you are playing live shows at your local pub, even at an open mic event you can still be making a bit of money with your MUSIC and claiming music royalties. By joining the PRS in the UK you can claim for each performance in a venue that is registered with a PRS music license. There is a PRS license sticker in the window of these places and ask the manager if they are licensed. Most of the time they have to be – even sandwich shops and hairdressers have to have licenses to play Bella Ciao Remix in public. Which has it’s pros and cons I know, but as a musician you can take a share of the moneys allocated by registering your tracks/setlist even if it was a small gig with very few audience members.

However, all this isn’t really as fine and dandy as it may seem. the outdated laws of copyright quickly come in and ruin everything. Just by using a 5 second bit of a song, you can’t sell it…OR let it be downloaded. THAT’S where it gets ridiculous. So, I’m guessing/hoping that you wonder what my solution to all this is. Well it’s quite simple really. I think ‘Remixes’ and the like should be looked at as different music. They should not have to face the ridiculous copyright laws.

You will find many New York music venues that most people view as music institutions. This includes the Metropolitan Opera House, the Avery Fisher Hall and the New York State Theater, all located at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. It is also home to Juilliard School, where many respected artists today studied.

Choose your music software so that you can get output in many different forms. Most software packages allow copying your music onto CDs or DVDs. Look for software that lets you convert your music into mp3 or wav format. These files can be uploaded to the web or even shared among band members easily via email. You can store a number of mp3 files or wav files in a thumb drive or players such as iPods. This makes it easy to carry your music all the time so that you can play it to an audience whenever an opportunity presents itself.

The era of electronic music has opened up the doors to many independent artists, and that’s great! But it has also opened up another huge aspect of the industry. Remixes. The change in modern music has sparked a massive revolution of young people, armed with a computer and some software, producing amazing remixes and unique sounds. This may not seem like a major breakthrough to the industry, but it is.

It is very important that the participating training partners rows synchronously according to the music beats. After a little practice you will find it easy, fun and very rewarding to exercise with music this way. Paces below 24 SPM and over 28 SPM are bit more demanding to follow for less experienced rowers. Remember to praise your training partners for their efforts. Training to rowing adapted music is growing very popular, because it is a lot more fun to train hard to good music. Have fun!